Team:Toulouse/Project/binding

From 2014.igem.org

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<center><img style="width:700px; " src="http://2014.igem.org/wiki/images/e/e1/Bindingresume.png"></center>
<center><img style="width:700px; " src="http://2014.igem.org/wiki/images/e/e1/Bindingresume.png"></center>
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<p class="legend">Figure 1: Schema of the binding module</p>
         <p class="texte"> In order to be highly efficient in the fight against the pythopathogen, our optimized bacterium has to be anchored to the fungus. Thus, we designed a chimeric protein (<a href="http://parts.igem.org/Part:BBa_K1364005"target="_blank">BBa_K1364005</a>) capable of building a <B>bridge between the bacterial peptidoglycan and the fungal chitin</B>, the main component of the pathogen’s cell wall. According to the work of <a href="http://2010.igem.org/Team:Imperial_College_London"target="_blank">the Imperial College 2010</a> iGEM team, we used the Cell Wall Binding (CWB) domain of the LytC protein (coding for a N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase) to attach our chimeric protein to the <I>B. subtilis</I> cell wall. On the other side of our protein, we added the domain 4 of  GbpA from <I>Vibrio cholerae</I>, which is known to recognize chitin.
         <p class="texte"> In order to be highly efficient in the fight against the pythopathogen, our optimized bacterium has to be anchored to the fungus. Thus, we designed a chimeric protein (<a href="http://parts.igem.org/Part:BBa_K1364005"target="_blank">BBa_K1364005</a>) capable of building a <B>bridge between the bacterial peptidoglycan and the fungal chitin</B>, the main component of the pathogen’s cell wall. According to the work of <a href="http://2010.igem.org/Team:Imperial_College_London"target="_blank">the Imperial College 2010</a> iGEM team, we used the Cell Wall Binding (CWB) domain of the LytC protein (coding for a N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase) to attach our chimeric protein to the <I>B. subtilis</I> cell wall. On the other side of our protein, we added the domain 4 of  GbpA from <I>Vibrio cholerae</I>, which is known to recognize chitin.
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<center style="margin:-30px;"><img style="width:500px; " src="http://2014.igem.org/wiki/images/a/a0/Binding.png"></center>
<center style="margin:-30px;"><img style="width:500px; " src="http://2014.igem.org/wiki/images/a/a0/Binding.png"></center>
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<p class="legend">Figure 2: Binding gene composition</p>
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<center style="margin:20px;"><img style="width:500px; " src="http://2014.igem.org/wiki/images/f/f5/BBa_K1364005.png"></center>
<center style="margin:20px;"><img style="width:500px; " src="http://2014.igem.org/wiki/images/f/f5/BBa_K1364005.png"></center>
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<p class="legend">Figure 3: Binding gene construction</p>
<p class="title1">References</p>
<p class="title1">References</p>

Revision as of 12:25, 17 October 2014