Team:Toulouse/Project/Chemotaxis

From 2014.igem.org

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Chemotaxis is a bacterial function which allows moving toward a gradient of concentration of a molecule that is present in the medium. With this system bacteria can swim to a location containing higher concentrations of molecules such as sugar, amino acid, vitamins... Chemotactic-signal transducers respond to changes in the concentration of attractants and repellents in the environment, transduce the signal from the outside to the inside of the cell, and facilitate sensory adaptation through the variation of the level of methylation.  
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Chemotaxis is a bacterial function which induces a movement toward a gradient of concentration of a molecule of interest. With this system the bacteria are able to swim to a location containing higher concentrations of molecules such as sugar, amino acid, vitamins...  
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Chemotactic-signal transducers respond to changes in the concentration of attractants and repellents in the environment, transduce the signal from the outside to the inside of the cell, and facilitate sensory adaptation through the variation of the level of methylation.  
<p class="title1">More information on this module</p>
<p class="title1">More information on this module</p>
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Chemotaxis is used as a way to detect and come close to the location of fungi infection. During its growth, fungi release N-acetylglucosamine (NAG), the basic unit of chitin which composed its cell wall. Thus, there should exist a gradient of the concentration of NAG around the fungi.</p>
Chemotaxis is used as a way to detect and come close to the location of fungi infection. During its growth, fungi release N-acetylglucosamine (NAG), the basic unit of chitin which composed its cell wall. Thus, there should exist a gradient of the concentration of NAG around the fungi.</p>
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It is known that <i>B. subtilis</i> is able to detect and to swim towards glucose using the Methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein, called <b>McpA</b>.<br>
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It is known that <i>B. subtilis</i> is able to detect and to swim towards glucose using the Methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein, henceforth called <b>McpA</b>(<a> href="MCPA_BACSU"_blanck">MCPA_BACSU).<br>
Some bacteria are attracted by NAG, like <i>Vibrio cholerae</i> which has a NAG regulated methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein: <b>VCD</b> (<a href="http://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/C3NYT2"_blank">VCD_000306</a>).</p>
Some bacteria are attracted by NAG, like <i>Vibrio cholerae</i> which has a NAG regulated methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein: <b>VCD</b> (<a href="http://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/C3NYT2"_blank">VCD_000306</a>).</p>
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Therefore, our idea is to switch the natural glucose specificity of <i>B. subtilis'</i> McpA to a NAG specificity. To achieve this, we need to change the extracellular domain of McpA, the domain responsible for the specificity, by the extracellular domain of VCD.
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Therefore, our idea is to switch the natural glucose specificity of <i>B. subtilis'</i>, mediated by McpA, to a NAG specificity. To achieve this, we need to change the extracellular domain of McpA, responsible for the specificity, by the extracellular domain of VCD.
The whole sequence has been designed <i>in silico</i> and codon optimized for the transcription in <i>B. subtilis</i> before its synthesis.</p>
The whole sequence has been designed <i>in silico</i> and codon optimized for the transcription in <i>B. subtilis</i> before its synthesis.</p>
<center><img width="600px" SRC="http://2014.igem.org/wiki/images/e/e4/Chimio2.png" alt="gene construct" style="margin-bottom:40px;"></center>
<center><img width="600px" SRC="http://2014.igem.org/wiki/images/e/e4/Chimio2.png" alt="gene construct" style="margin-bottom:40px;"></center>
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<p class="legend">Figure 3: Construction of chemotaxis gene</p>
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<p class="legend">Figure 3: Construction of the chemotaxis gene</p>
<p class="title1">References</p>
<p class="title1">References</p>

Revision as of 20:14, 17 October 2014