Team:Toulouse/Project/Chemotaxis

From 2014.igem.org

(Difference between revisions)
 
(18 intermediate revisions not shown)
Line 36: Line 36:
.banniere-content{
.banniere-content{
-
  background-color: rgba(46,204,113, 0.6);
+
  background-color: rgba(130,196,108, 0.7);
padding:28px 28px 0;
padding:28px 28px 0;
position:absolute;
position:absolute;
Line 45: Line 45:
color:white
color:white
}
}
 +
 +
p.legend{color:#5a6060; font-family:'Open Sans'; font-size:14px; margin:0 0 50px 0; line-height:24px; text-align: center;}
.banniere-content h2{
.banniere-content h2{
Line 55: Line 57:
font-size:16px
font-size:16px
}
}
 +
 +
li.tree {
 +
  display : list-item;
 +
list-style-image: url(http://2014.igem.org/wiki/images/a/a7/388438arbrefleurs.png);
 +
}
</style>
</style>
Line 76: Line 83:
   <div id="innercontenthome">
   <div id="innercontenthome">
-
       <div class="centering" style="padding-top: 85px; padding-bottom:40px;">
+
       <div class="centering" style="padding-top: 65px; padding-bottom:40px;">
   <!--Short description : à changer!!!-->
   <!--Short description : à changer!!!-->
 +
 +
 +
<center><img style="width:420px; " src="http://parts.igem.org/wiki/images/e/e9/Recap_chemotax.jpg"></center>
 +
<p class="legend">Figure 1: Schema of the chemotaxis module</p>
<p class="title1">What is chemotaxis?</p>
<p class="title1">What is chemotaxis?</p>
<p class="texte">
<p class="texte">
-
Chemotaxis is a bacterial function which allows bacteria to move according a concentration gradient. With this system bacteria can find better place to grow by swimming toward higher concentrations of molecules, such as nutritional molecules like sugar, amino acid, vitamins...
+
Chemotaxis is a bacterial function which induces a movement toward a gradient of concentration of a molecule of interest. With this system the bacteria are able to swim to a location containing higher concentrations of molecules such as sugar, amino acid, vitamins...  
-
</br>
+
Chemotactic-signal transducers respond to changes in the concentration of attractants and repellents in the environment, transduce the signal from the outside to the inside of the cell, and facilitate sensory adaptation through the variation of the level of methylation.  
-
In our case, chemotaxis is used as a way to detect and approach fungus. Indeed during its growth, fungi release N-acetylglucosamine, a monomer of chitin which is specific to fungal presence. Thus, there is a gradient of N- acetylglucosamine around fungi.</p>
+
-
 
+
-
<center><img style="width:420px; " src="http://parts.igem.org/wiki/images/e/e9/Recap_chemotax.jpg"></center>
+
 +
<p class="title1">More information on this module</p>
 +
<p class="texte">
 +
Chemotaxis is used as a way to detect and come close to the location of fungi infection. During its growth, fungi release N-acetylglucosamine (NAG), the basic unit of chitin which composed its cell wall. Thus, there should exist a gradient of the concentration of NAG around the fungi.</p>
<p class="texte">
<p class="texte">
-
Unfortunately <i>Bacillus subtilis</i> is not able to detect such gradient, but <i>Bacillus</i> is able to detect and to move towards sugar like glucose thanks a glucose specific receptor, VcpA. But other bacteria can detect these kind of molecule, for example <i>Vibrio cholerae</i>, which has a specific receptor for N- acetylglucosamine, VCD.</p>
+
It is known that <i>B. subtilis</i> is able to detect and to swim towards glucose using the Methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein, henceforth called <b>McpA</b> (<a href="http://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/P39214"_blanck">MCPA_BACSU</a>).<br>
 +
Some bacteria are attracted by NAG, like <i>Vibrio cholerae</i> which has a NAG regulated methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein: <b>VCD</b> (<a href="http://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/C3NYT2"_blank">VCD_000306</a>).</p>
-
<center><img SRC="http://2014.igem.org/wiki/images/c/cf/Schema_chemotaxis.png" alt="schema"></center>
+
<center><img width="500px" SRC="http://2014.igem.org/wiki/images/4/47/Chimio1.png" alt="schema" style="margin-bottom:60px;"></center>
 +
<p class="legend">Figure 2: Chimeric protein of chemotaxis</p>
<p class="texte">
<p class="texte">
-
Therefore, our idea is pretty simple, we switch glucose specificity by N-acetylglucosamine specificity. So we need to modify the extracellular part of VcpA, the part which is responsible of the specificity, by the extracellular part of a N-acetylglucosamine receptor, VCD.</p>
+
Therefore, our idea is to switch the natural glucose specificity of <i>B. subtilis'</i>, mediated by McpA, to a NAG specificity. To achieve this, we need to change the extracellular domain of McpA, responsible for the specificity, by the extracellular domain of VCD.
 +
The whole sequence has been designed <i>in silico</i> and codon optimized for the transcription in <i>B. subtilis</i> before its synthesis.</p>
-
<center><img SRC="http://2014.igem.org/wiki/images/c/cf/Gene_chemotaxis.png" alt="gene construct"></center>
+
<center><img width="600px" SRC="http://2014.igem.org/wiki/images/e/e4/Chimio2.png" alt="gene construct" style="margin-bottom:40px;"></center>
 +
<p class="legend">Figure 3: Construction of the chemotaxis gene</p>
-
<p class="title1">References</p>
+
<center><a href="http://2014.igem.org/Team:Toulouse/Result/experimental-results"> <img src="http://parts.igem.org/wiki/images/f/fe/Jump.jpg"> </a></center>
-
<p class="texte">
 
-
- K. Meibom,L. Xibing, A. Nielsen, CY. Wu, S. Roseman and G. Schoolnik.<b> The Vibrio cholerae chitin utilization program </b>. The National Academy of Sciences of the USA (2004). <br>
 
-
-C. Kristich and GW. Ordal.<b>Bacillus subtilis CheD is a chemoreceptor modification enzyme required for chemotaxis</b>. J Biol Chem. 2002 Jul 12;277(28):25356-62. Epub 2002 May 13.<br></p>
 
 +
<p class="title1">References</p>
 +
<ul>
 +
 +
<li class="tree"><p class="texte">K. Meibom,L. Xibing, A. Nielsen, CY. Wu, S. Roseman, and G. Schoolnik.<b> The <i>Vibrio cholerae</i> chitin utilization program </b>. The National Academy of Sciences of the USA (2004).</p></li>
 +
<li class="tree"><p class="texte">C. Kristich, and GW. Ordal. <b><i>Bacillus subtilis</i> CheD is a chemoreceptor modification enzyme required for chemotaxis</b>. J Biol Chem. 2002 Jul 12;277(28):25356-62. Epub 2002 May 13.<br></p></li>
 +
</ul>
      
      
   <!-- Navigation section -->   
   <!-- Navigation section -->   

Latest revision as of 02:59, 18 October 2014