Team:Melbourne

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<p>Star-shaped peptides are a promising biomaterial being proposed for use in nanomedicine. While star peptides have conventionally been synthesised in vitro, the University of Melbourne iGEM team aims to use the peptide-synthesis machinery of E. coli to produce peptides in vivo. Star peptide precursors will be expressed as heterologous proteins in E. coli. Further processing using both the protein folding enzymes of E. coli and simple in vitro chemical synthesis techniques will yield star peptides. The products will be designed such that the arms of the stars may be functionalised with peptides, proteins, and other biomacromolecules. Thus, the project will develop a novel and powerful platform technology for the synthesis of new biomaterials. The technology developed may be readily applied in a variety of biomedical contexts, including drug delivery, infection control and cancer treatment. </p>
<p>Star-shaped peptides are a promising biomaterial being proposed for use in nanomedicine. While star peptides have conventionally been synthesised in vitro, the University of Melbourne iGEM team aims to use the peptide-synthesis machinery of E. coli to produce peptides in vivo. Star peptide precursors will be expressed as heterologous proteins in E. coli. Further processing using both the protein folding enzymes of E. coli and simple in vitro chemical synthesis techniques will yield star peptides. The products will be designed such that the arms of the stars may be functionalised with peptides, proteins, and other biomacromolecules. Thus, the project will develop a novel and powerful platform technology for the synthesis of new biomaterials. The technology developed may be readily applied in a variety of biomedical contexts, including drug delivery, infection control and cancer treatment. </p>

Revision as of 22:52, 13 October 2014

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Star-shaped peptides are a promising biomaterial being proposed for use in nanomedicine. While star peptides have conventionally been synthesised in vitro, the University of Melbourne iGEM team aims to use the peptide-synthesis machinery of E. coli to produce peptides in vivo. Star peptide precursors will be expressed as heterologous proteins in E. coli. Further processing using both the protein folding enzymes of E. coli and simple in vitro chemical synthesis techniques will yield star peptides. The products will be designed such that the arms of the stars may be functionalised with peptides, proteins, and other biomacromolecules. Thus, the project will develop a novel and powerful platform technology for the synthesis of new biomaterials. The technology developed may be readily applied in a variety of biomedical contexts, including drug delivery, infection control and cancer treatment.



University of Melbourne iGEM team

Welcome, from the team at the University of Melbourne, Australia

Contact us via email at melbourneuniigem@gmail.com


Website under development


Abstract

Star-shaped peptides are a promising biomaterial being proposed for use in nanomedicine. While star peptides have conventionally been synthesised in vitro, the University of Melbourne iGEM team aims to use the peptide-synthesis machinery of E. coli to produce peptides in vivo. Star peptide precursors will be expressed as heterologous proteins in E. coli. Further processing using both the protein folding enzymes of E. coli and simple in vitro chemical synthesis techniques will yield star peptides. The products will be designed such that the arms of the stars may be functionalised with peptides, proteins, and other biomacromolecules. Thus, the project will develop a novel and powerful platform technology for the synthesis of new biomaterials. The technology developed may be readily applied in a variety of biomedical contexts, including drug delivery, infection control and cancer treatment.

Our Team

  • Sean Lowe
  • Henry Howard
  • Ranit Lahmy
  • Aishwarya Kulkarni
  • Michael Wei
  • Darcy Marum
  • Elizabeth Brookes
  • Keit Loi
  • Lumi Tomren
  • Michelle Zheng
  • Nicholas Yee
  • Peter Collins
  • Robyn E
  • Melissa Leckie
  • Gayle Pereira
  • Sheryl Ding
  • Stan Yatskevich
  • Tobias Gustavsson
  • Wayne Zheng