Team:Aberdeen Scotland/Parts/Device

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<h1>Background to Parts Design</h1>
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<h1>Detector Test Data</h1>
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<p>Antigen 43 (Ag43), the product of the </i>flu</i> gene, is a cell-surface autotransporter protein found in <i>Escherichia coli</i>. It is expressed at about 50,
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<p>The initial concept of the fluorescence detector device had a very rough design. Thus it was built from bits and pieces in order to do a preliminary test and
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000 copies/cell and is initially synthesised as a precursor of 1039 amino acids. Upon removal of the signal peptide, the protein is transported to the cell surface
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verify its viability.</p>
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and is composed of an α subunit (499 amino acids) at the N-terminus and a β subunit (488 amino acids) at the C-terminus. Ag43 is mainly known to induce cell-to-cell
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aggregation and be involved in biofilm formation. However, as the necessary information required for auto transportation resides in the protein itself, the main of
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<img src="http://2014.igem.org/wiki/images/a/a0/Rough_set.jpg">
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our project was to use it as a platform for displaying specific peptides on the surface of <i>E. coli</i>.</p>
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<img src="http://2014.igem.org/wiki/images/2/2e/Ag43.jpg" alt="Ag43">
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<p>The preliminary data from the tests showed that the detector was able to differentiate between GFP producing and non-producing bacteria.</p>
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<img src="http://2014.igem.org/wiki/images/e/e9/Lb_vs_gfp.png">
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<p>Fig.1 Series dilutions to estimate detector sensitivity</p>
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<p>From Fig.1 we can see that the detector can easily distinguish the GFP producing culture from below 1/10 dilutions. Thus we continued on and improved the design by soldering some of the circuit and making it more compact. Then we made more test with the Sender and Receiver bacteria.</p>
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Revision as of 23:00, 17 October 2014

Team:Aberdeen Scotland/Parts - 2014.ogem.org



Detector Test Data


The initial concept of the fluorescence detector device had a very rough design. Thus it was built from bits and pieces in order to do a preliminary test and verify its viability.

The preliminary data from the tests showed that the detector was able to differentiate between GFP producing and non-producing bacteria.

Fig.1 Series dilutions to estimate detector sensitivity

From Fig.1 we can see that the detector can easily distinguish the GFP producing culture from below 1/10 dilutions. Thus we continued on and improved the design by soldering some of the circuit and making it more compact. Then we made more test with the Sender and Receiver bacteria.